Monday, June 1, 2015

Celebrating a Coronation in the Regency

Or at least, the coronation that ended the Regency.  I found this little gem in Totnes in Devon, England.  If you have never heard of Totnes, it is a town with a long history, more of which we will be hearing about later.  This however was an unexpected glimpse into Regency life.

Bear with me. This is not a great photo but circumstances were difficult.  These are the regulations to celebrate George IV's coronation and to summarize,

The Committee and the local folk were to assemble at 10 am and preceded by a band process to Mayoralty House were they would pick up the Corporation (town corporation or Council)  and from thence attend a religious service.

After which they would process back to the Bowling-green, where the Stewards would take their stations at tables set out where "Oh the Roast Beef of Old England" would be heard and I assume served and be said stewards would "joined by their neighbours in the attack on the solid fair provided for the occasion."

It advises that "Every person must provide himself with a Plate, Knife and Fork and Cup and take his station with his family specified in is ticket".

At five O'clock tables will be cleared and tea provided for females and children under the supervision of LADIES.  So the Ladies are the gentry one assumes are laying this on for the general populace.

After this the Festivities are to conclude with Music and Dancing on the Bowling-green.

So in the Regency, that is how a Coronation was celebrated in a very small town in Devon.

Until next time…..