Thursday, September 29, 2016

Regency Fashion for August 1816

   
MORNING DRESS from Ackermann's August 1816

A round dress, composed of jaconot muslin, finished round the bottom of the skirt by a deep flounce of rich work scalloped at the edge, and a heading to correspond. 

The body has a slight fullness behind. The form of the front, as our readers will perceive by our print, is extremely novel and pretty. 

Plain long sleeve, finished at the wrist by a pink band and bow. 

The cornette worn with this dress is of the mob kind, and by much the most becoming we have ever seen: it is composed of white lace, and tastefully ornamented with roses. 

Pink kid slippers, and white kid gloves.

This dress is much approved by belles of taste for its elegant simplicity; its form and materials are certainly strictly appropriate to morning costume. It was invented by Mrs. Gill, of Cork-street, Burlington Gardens, to whom we are indebted for it.

While Ackermann's like the form of the body at the front, personally I am not that keen on it. I am however intrigued by the comment that it is strictly "appropriate".  I really love the hem, it is so very pretty and lacy, as well as the pink kid slippers.  I especially like the setting since she is sitting on what I assume is a music stool and hold a book of sheet music.  What do you think?  Do you like the cornette?

Until next time............

Monday, September 26, 2016

Regency Fashion - July 1816

     From Ackermann's July 1816
         

 OPERA DRESS.

THIS dress is composed of white lace, and is worn over a rich soft white satin slip. 

The skirt is trimmed, in a style of peculiar elegance, with lace festooned at regular distances; the festoons are edged by a plain band of byas satin, and finished by pearl ornaments of a very novel and pretty shape. 

The body, composed also of lace, is cut byas, and is richly ornamented round the bosom with pointed lace. 

Plain long sleeve, very full, except towards the wrist, which is nearly tight to the arm, and elegantly finished with lace. 

The hair, which is ornamented only with a wreath of French roses, is parted in front, and simply dressed in loose curls, which fall very low on each side. The hind hair forms a tuft at the back of the head. 

Necklace, ear-rings, and bracelets of pearl. 

White satin slippers, and white kid gloves. 

A blush-coloured French silk scarf is thrown carelessly over the shoulders.

We are indebted for this very elegant and tasteful dress to a lady of rank, by whom it has just been introduced.

I wonder who the young lady of rank might have been?

Until Next Time - Happy Rambles

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Regency Fashion June 1816

 
A second lovely gown from our Mrs Gill of Cork Street, Burlington Gardens. I think you might agree that there is great similarity in these two gowns.

I should also note that the marriage of Princess Charlotte had great influence on the fashions at this time.



Evening Gown - June !816 Ackermann's

This dress is composed of white lace, and worn over a rich white soft satin slip; the skirt is finished round the bottom by a deep flounce of lace, and three narrow byas satin tucks, which are surmounted by a wreath of beautiful fancy flowers. 

The body and sleeves are peculiarly elegant and novel; a satin front, which forms the shape in an easy and becoming style, is ornamented at each side with a light embroidery of flowers, and finished with bows of ribbon. The sleeve, for which we must refer our readers to the print, is, we think, the most tasteful that has been lately introduced. 

The hair is parted so as partially display the forehead, and ornamented with a wreath of flowers. 

Necklace, ear-rings and bracelets of diamonds. 

White kid gloves, and white satin slippers richly embroidered in coloured silks. 

A rich white lace scarf is thrown carelessly over the left shoulder, and partially shades one side of the neck.
Here is a special tidbit just for you!  Fashionable colours for the month are, green of all the lighter shades, evening primrose, sapphire blue, pale blush colour, and straw colour.

I do wish I could see the embroidery on the slippers.

Until next time............  Happy Rambles

Monday, September 19, 2016

Regency Fashion June 2015

Bridal Gown from Ackermann's June 1816
June 1816 Bridal Gown, Ackermann's This is one of the prettiest gowns we have seen for a while.

Of particular note is the statement that it was designed specifically as a wedding gown, though I must believe the experts in their judgement that in this era the gown would not have been worn for that one occasion only.

Here is the official description:

A FROCK of striped French gauze over a white satin slip: the bottom of the frock is superbly trimmed with a deep flounce of Brussels lace, which is surmounted by a single tuck of byas [sic] white satin and a wreath of roses; above the wreath are two tucks of byas [sic] white satin. 

We refer our readers to our print for the form of the body and sleeve: it is singularly novel and tasteful, but we are forbidden either to describe it, or to mention the materials of which it is composed. 

The hair is dressed low at the sides, and parted so as to entirely display the forehead: it is ornamented with an elegant aigrette of pearls in front, and a sprig of French roses placed nearly at the back of the head. 

Necklace, ear-rings, and bracelets of pearl. White kid gloves and white satin slippers.

We have to thank Mrs. Gill of Cork-street, Burlington Gardens, for both our dresses this month; and we must observe, that the one we have just described, is a wedding-dress which she has recently finished for a young lady of high distinction.

So, there we have a wedding-dress pretty enough to be worn today.


The second gown spoken off will appear in my next blog as I continue to try to catch up.  This summer has been a busy one, with books due and relatives visiting from England, not to mention not a single rainy day to keep me indoors at the computer.  I hope you didn't miss me to much? Or forget me?

Until next time............

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Fashion May 1816

A Carriage Dress from Ackermann's for May 1816

A cambric slip, tucked very high, and finished at the bottom with a deep flounce of worked muslin.

Over the slip is a robe of the same material, open in front, and trimmed all round with very rich work. The body of the robe is made in the chemiset style, and displays a lace fichu worn underneath.

The long sleeve is ornamented with a bow of blue ribbon, and finished at the wrist by a novel and elegant ruffle.

Head-dress, a cornette composed of plain white lace, profusely trimmed with flounces and blue ribbon.

Gloves and slippers of blue kid.

This dress is likely to continue a favourite, because, independent of its novelty, it is extremely elegant and striking; and both its form and material are peculiarly appropriate to the present season.

We are again indebted to the elegant invention of Mrs. Gill of Cork-street, Burlington-Gardens, for both our dresses this month.


Enjoy!  Until Next time.................

Monday, August 1, 2016

Fashion for May 1816

Evening Gown May 1816
   A WHITE satin slip, over which is a white lace dress, ornamented with three quillings of white lace on the skirt, intermixed with bows of white satin ribbon. 

The body and sleeve, both of which are richly ornamented with coloured stones, are formed, as our readers will see by the print, in a very novel style.

Head-dress, a cap composed of white satin, finished with a band edged with pearls and a superb plume of white feathers.

Necklace, ear-rings, and bracelets, coloured stones intermixed with pearls. White satin slippers, and white kid gloves.


Such a pretty dress!

Until next time.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Fashion April 1816

Opera Dress Ackermann's April 1816

Oddly, this is almost exactly the same gown as the other plate for 1816.  I guess this really was the in look for this particular months.

Here is the description.

Opera Dress

White satin slip, over which is a white lace skirt, finished with satin tucks and a rich flounce of deep blond at the bottom. The body is composed of white satin and white lace; it is uncommonly novel and elegant.

The sleeve, which is long, is also composed of satin and lace; its form is original, and the manner in which it is finished at the wrist is singularly tasteful and elegant. The hair is disposed so as to display the forehead, and falls in short loose curls at each side. Head-dress the Berlin cap composed of white satin, lower part ornamented with a rich gold band, and the crown with a profusion of beautiful short ostrich feathers, disposed with much taste and novelty.

The Berlin cap, is, in our opinion, the most generally becoming head-dress which has been introduced for some seasons.

Necklace and cross composed of pearl and amethyst. Pearl ear-rings. White kid gloves and white satin slippers.

We are indebted to the good taste and exquisite invention of Mrs. Gill, of Cork-street, Burlington-Gardens for both our dresses this month.

Until Next time............





Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Playing Catch Up

Oops how did this happen.

No fashion since April? Right. Sleeves rolled up. Back on it.

I'll be posting couple a week until we are all caught up to August.

Where have I been in the meantime? I had a great trip to England. Stayed at a house Jane Austen used to visit. More on that to come. I feel a blog coming on. But I have to say it was quite a thrill.

I also visited my editor and the editorial team at Harlequin, Mills and Boon in London as well as other interesting spots.


Since then  have been to the Romance Writers of America Conference in San Diego, where I learned much, and this week gave a talk at the Limestone Genre Festival in Kingston.

Oh, I have been busy, have I not.?Well now I am back to my writing in full force,and to the blog.

Look out for the first fashion post on Thursday.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

More Than A Lover

Introducing Bladen Read from More Than A Lover In stores April 19
  

Lots of giveaways and events happening. Here are some links:
April 19 and May 1  Blog and giveaway at CelebratewithaBook.com
April 19 Prettyhot.com

Until next time......................





Thursday, April 7, 2016

Regency Fashion - April 1816

MORNING DRESS April 1816 - Ackermann's

A ROUND dress composed of cambric, and finished at the bottom with a number of small tucks, and a very richly worked flounce with a heading. The back has just fullness enough to give the dress an air of ease, without disguising the contour of the shape. 

We refer our readers to the print for the front. Long and very loose sleeve, with a very elegant half sleeve and cuff. A shirt richly trimmed round the collar with lace, and thrown open at the throat, where it fastens with a gold and coral broach. 

Hair parted on the forehead and dressed low at the sides. Head-dress an exquisitely fancied lace cap, of a form extremely simple, but uncommonly becoming: it is ornamented with bows of lilac ribbon. 

Plain gold ear-rings, and white kid slippers and gloves.

Don't forget to check out my Goodreads Giveaway of my upcoming book More Than A Lover

Until next time.................


Monday, March 28, 2016

Goodreads Giveaway

Starts April 1

More Than a Lover


Will he unlace all of her secrets? 

Former captain Bladen Read knows respectable Caroline Falkner would never look twice at an illegitimate ruffian like him. But when he's suddenly thrown into the role of her protector he discovers the undercurrent of tension runs both ways… 

At first Caro tries to resist the pull of attraction, for Blade is a link to the scandalous past she buried long ago to protect her son. Although when the opportunity to explore this rake's expertise in the bedroom presents itself, temptation proves too much to resist!



Goodreads Book Giveaway

More Than a Lover by Ann Lethbridge

More Than a Lover

by Ann Lethbridge

April 1 April 18, 2016.
See the giveaway details at Goodreads.
Enter Giveaway

Monday, March 21, 2016

Regency Fashion March 1816


Carriage Dress From Ackermanns From March 1816

To me this looks like a cross between a graduation outfit and a carpet.

Here is the official Description

A high body of jaconot muslin, with a lace frill, over which is a low one, formed of pink silk and trimmed with the same material; the upper part of the trimming is tastefully ornamented with bows of pink ribbon. 

Long loose sleeve, finished down the arm with bands and bows, to correspond with the trimming of the train; it is drawn tight at the wrist, and ornamented with a large pink bow. 

A superb French shawl is thrown carelessly over the shoulders. 

The hair is dressed very much off the forehead, and low on each side of the face. 

Head-dress, the Polish cap, which is uncommonly novel and pretty; it is composed of black velvet and ornamented with a silk tassel and gold band. 

Necklace, ear-rings, and cross, composed of gold and pearl. French watch, set with pearls. White kid gloves, and black Levantine sandals.

Mrs. Gill, of Cork-street, Burlington Gardens, has favoured us with the original and 
elegantly fancied dresses given in our prints this month.

Until next time.....


Monday, March 14, 2016

Brighton Revisited

I anticipated this post would be purely selfish. And yet after digging a bit deeper, perhaps it has some relevance to Regency-world lovers also.

As I have mentioned, Brighton has family associations for me. My dear mother in law, Kit, lived there as a girl, and it is where she met her husband Richard Samuel.  And it is not every family that can lay claim to a huge building in a major town - or at least a small part in its beginning.

This is the Burton Tailors building on the corner of North and West Streets in Brighton.

Richard Samuel and his brother Lawrence had a hand in its construction in 1926.  They were bricklayers.  And this is how Sam, as he was known, who originated in London's East End, met Kit, because just up the road from here lies Wyckham Terrace. Clearly whoever designed the building was trying to capture some of the Regency style of the town.

If you are wondering about the blob at the top of the picture. That is a rain drop. England, people! Raining!  Naturally, I could not resist investigating the building's history. Burtons occupied the store until the 1990's. But what a wonderful surprise, look the tailors are gone to smaller premises and now it hosts a lovely bookstore.  Waterstones.  Such a thrill to find such a neat connection.





Travelling back in time, courtesy of the regencysociety.org the corner was occupied by Geo. Bull, Grocer and Tea Dealer in 1875




http://regencysociety-jamesgray.com/volume21/source/jg_21_003.html


But here is the real treasure, North Street in 1851.  G. Bull occupies number 71 on the corner. Father or grandfather, perhaps. I think North Street might well have looked similar in the period of the Regency, don't you?

http://regencysociety-jamesgray.com/volume21/source/jg_21_001.html 


Until next time....................

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Regency Fashion - the hush hush gown

Evening Dress, March 1817 the trimming of which is top secret---apparently....

From the March Ackermann's Repository 1816

EVENING DRESS.

WHITE satin slip trimmed with a deep flounce of blond lace, set on full and finished by a double heading.

The upper dress is a robe composed of striped French gauze, open in front: the waist is very short; and the body, which is made in a perfectly novel style, displays the contour of the shape to the utmost advantage.

For the form of the sleeve, which is peculiarly elegant, we refer our readers to the print; as we are also obliged to do for the beautiful trimming which goes round the robe: it is composed of novel materials, which we are not allowed to describe.

Hair dressed much off the forehead, and low at the sides. Head-dress Circassian turban composed of French gauze: the ends, which depend from each side, are so disposed as partly to shade the neck; they are extremely rich and beautiful.

The only ornament is a superb aigrette composed of pearls and rubies. This head-dress is well calculated for graceful and majestic belles, to whom it gives what the French term l’air imposant.

Necklace, earrings, bracelets, rubies intermixed with pearls. White satin slippers and white kid gloves.

................My excuses for the pallor of this plate.  I must say, the dress is pretty, both the robe and the petticoat beneath, but that the trimming is a secret, well curiosity killed the cat. I must visit this modiste immediately to see it for myself.


Until next time.

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Needlework

From time to time I post a needlework project I have completed.  Here is a blackwork tray cloth I undertook after a class with Liz Almond. It took me ages to do.

You can imagine this on one of the ubiquitous tea trays that always make an appearance in many scenes. Er... not in my house though. No putting rings on my tray cloth, thank you very much.

As you may know, Blackwork is from an earlier era, and was simply something I wanted to try, along with the fancy edging that might well have been used in the Regency period for finishing a handkerchief. The style would have been known to our ladies of the ton, if only from the paintings in their galleries of ancestors. Not in this form though, which is a modern take on it. I can assure you, the back does not look exactly like the front.

I often read about Regency heroines who hate embroidery. Knowing how satisfying this form of creation is, to me hating embroidery or needlework, seems like us hating having new paint on the walls of our living space or even hating having a job.  Embroidery was an expression of a lady's skill in making her home a comfortable and beautiful place to live. A Lady (as against a woman) would have hours of time at her disposal, and since medieval times and before, embroidery was valued for its beauty and its purpose. It was a sign of being a lady, in my opinion.

All of my heroines have some embroidery on the go, just like me. While embroidery on a gown might be done by a seamstress, embroidery on underthings, monograms on handkerchiefs, decorative pillows, embroidery on slippers, would be the privilege and pride of a lady, who would sew while her hero read to her, or a sibling did so, or while merely sitting chatting of an afternoon or evening. She would consider it her work, her contribution to her home.



Until next time.............


Monday, February 29, 2016

Leap Year Special and Fashion

Not only am I offering leap year special at BookGoodies.com, but I have an extra day to post  February fashions for 1816.

Promenade Dress - Ackermann's Februrary 1816

A morning dress, composed of the finest dark mulberry ladies’ cloth, finished at the bottom of the skirt with a new-invented trimming, which has an uncommonly light and pretty effect.

A plain high body, over which is worn a spencer made of velvet one shade darker than the dress and ornamented with white satin; the half-sleeve, which is composed of white satin, and finished with white silk ornaments, is particularly novel and tasteful.

Head-dress, improved French bonnet, lined, edged, and trimmed with white satin, and ornamented with white feathers. Pointed lace ruffs. Mulberry kid sandals and gloves.

The Roxburgh muff worn with this dress is composed of white satin and swansdown, and lined with white satin. This muff, which we may venture to recommend to our fair readers as a very elegant novelty, is just introduced by Mrs. Griffin, and is, from the beauty and delicacy of its materials, calculated only for the first style of promenade or carriage dress.

We are indebted to the taste and invention of Mrs. Griffin, of Rider-street, St. James’s, for both our prints this month.



Until next time............................

Thursday, February 11, 2016

St. Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day is always a special day in the world of Romance, no what genre or era.  In the Regency Valentine's Day was marked with not cards and chocolates as it is so often today. I love those little heart shaped boxes of chocolates. I always bought them for my daughters.  I digress.


Valentine's Day was more of a "home made" affair, with posies and poems from secret admirers. I would be looking for a posy of snowdrops in February in England. A sign that spring was just around the corner and that the dude (sorry, gentleman) had gone to some trouble to seek them out.

Which would be the flower to win your heart?






Talking of winning hearts, I have joined in with several other romance authors to give away St Valentine's Day goodies.  If you want to know more about the contests, check out my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AnnLethbridgeAuthor  Here is a graphic taste of what we are up to.



Wishing you all a happy day with your significant other, chocolate, a book, a movie, or whatever else floats your romance boat

Until next time

Monday, February 8, 2016

Regency Fashion February 1816

Given that the Season has hardly started, we begin with a very elegant gown.  Perhaps an invitation to a country estate came your way. If so, this would be apropos.

EVENING DRESS  Ackermann's February 1816

White crape, or lace frock, over a white satin slip; the body and sleeves are formed of a very elegant fancy material, which has just been introduced.

The body is extremely novel and elegant: we refer our readers for its form to our plate: the sleeve is very short, and, as well as the body, trimmed with blond, which is set on full.

The skirt is made a walking length, and is trimmed in a most tasteful style; but the slight view which we had of the dress will not permit us to describe it: our readers, will, however, be able to form a very correct idea of it from our plate.

Head-dress, the toque a la Rubens, composed of white lace, and ornamented with feathers and precious stones. Necklace, ear-rings, and locket, of diamonds.

White satin slippers trimmed en suite, and made, as all dress shoes now are, to come very high over the foot.

White kid gloves trimmed with tull. A French scarf, superbly embroidered at the ends, and thrown carelessly over the arm.

This dress, we understand, was invented by Mrs. Griffin for a lady of distinction; and it is certainly extremely novel and elegant.

The lack of specificity in this description is very odd. The fancy new material introduced.  The body novel, but then refers the reader to a plate in which it is difficult to see because the model is turned sideways on.

Marketing 1816 style?  Well done Mrs Griffin.

Until next time.


Monday, January 25, 2016

Fashion January 1816

I love the embroidery on this gown.

EVENING DRESS - Ackermann's   January 1816

A white crape frock over a satin slip; the frock is superbly ornamented with French Lama work in silver; the dress is cut very low all round the bosom, and the crape fronts are open at each side, so as to display the white satin one underneath.

The sleeve is an intermixture of white satin and crape; the latter full, the former tastefully ornamented with silver, to correspond with the bottom of the dress.

Head-dress, a white crape turban, ornamented with silver and a long white feather.

Necklace and ear-rings of pearl. White kid gloves, drawn nearly to the elbow, and finished at the top by a quilling of tull. White satin slippers.

This frock is also in high estimation for a ball-dress, with the hair full-dressed and pearl ornaments, or a comb composed of pearl and coloured gems.

We are indebted to the tasteful fancy of Mrs. Bean of Albemarle-street for both our dresses this month.

If you enjoy Regency romances, look out for my next book.  Details about where when and what

Coming Soon:


Until next time...........................................  

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Brighton Revisted 3

St Nicholas of Myra is an absolute treasure. It dates from the fourteenth century, though there has been a church in Brighthelstone since Saxon times. The main source of income for villagers was mackerel fishing and therefor the church is appropriately dedicated to the patron saint of fishermen and children.

The fact that this is the church where my mother in law was married makes it special to our family, but as a regency buff it is also special because of its association with those members of Regency society who would have attended church here during the summer months.

Here are some of the fascinating things about St Nicholas of interest to Regency aficionados.  The Duke of Wellington attended the school "The Academy for Young Gentlemen" run by the vicar of St Nicholas.  It was common practice for vicars to supplement their income by teaching the boys of local gentlemen at that time.

During the Regency, their were galleries in the church for local fisherman, charity pensioners and Charity-school children, while the more affluent worshiped in the box pews at ground level.  These galleries were removed during a major renovation in 1853.

The Church acquired a new organ in 1813, instrument built by H.C.Lincoln and pipes by Bevington.
If you have an interest in seeing the church before the restoration I have a picture showing the pews which hints at the galleries above, but the quality is such that I cannot include it here.

What does remain is the fifteenth century screen which is absolutely beautiful. It is thought to have come from East Anglia. Parts of it were destroyed when  the Cromwellians had a go at it, it was restored in the late 19th century.

While the stone pillars and arches were also there, the Galleries aforementioned were on a level with the festoons of the screen, making the church a much smaller and more crowded place.

 The Font, pictured here is from the 12th Century.

Made from a solid block of Caen Stone it is known as the finest piece of Norman carving in Sussex.

Of course my big question was, did all those Regency notables worship here at the only church in what became Brighton.  The local history says it was too far up the hill.

A chapel was therefore built nearer to the Pavillion. The Prince Regent rented one of the pews at 13 guineas a year.

However the Vicar at the time, preached a sermon about King David seducing Bathsheba and sending Prinny off from there in high dudgeon, never to return.

At the time of the Regency, the bell tower sported 8 bells and was known for marathon peals, ringing as many as 11,088 changes over six hours in 1779.  It became the first 10 bell tower in 1818.




Until next time................