Thursday, July 31, 2014

Fashion July 1814

I could not let July slip away without one more post on the fashion from the Regency Period.


From La Belle Assemblee:

Russian and Prussian Bonnet with Pelisse a-la-Militaire

I often put my heroines in something al-la-Militaire because it sounds daring. And let us facing we would all like to be daring, within bounds of course.

My first thoughts were, not so very Militaire and a bit hot for July.  But given the weather we have been having lately, well perhaps not. And does the military bit just refer to the colour, you know, Prussian blue?

Here is the description, it might shed a bit more light on the ideas of the designer.

Jacconet muslin high dress, with a rich letting-in of lace and embroidery of the same materials round the bottom: the body and sleeves of this dress are richly appliqued with lace. 
A most delicate blue sarsnet pelisse, trimmed a-la-Prusse, either with crape or satin of a dark shade. The sleeves and the front of the pelisse are slightly ornamented in the same tasteful manner; the back is full, and fastens round the waist by a fancy military girdle; an appliqueing of crape, to correspond in colour with the pelisse, is let-in round the bosom, and on each applique is a small satin flower. A rich lace ruff falls over. 
This walking costume is at present wholly confined to the highest class of our fair pedestrians, and we must say, it is equally distinguished for novelty and elegance; it also displays the figure to the greatest advantage. The captivating military bonnet which accompanies it, is highly characteristic of the elegant taste of its inventress: it bestows upon a pretty face that air which the French term piquant. 
We have observed of some hats which have formerly made their appearance under military appellations, that they gave a look of fierceness even to soft features: the reverse of this is the case with the Russian and Prussian Bonnet, which is one of the most generally becoming that we have ever seen.
 
The above dresses were invented, and can be obtained exclusively of Mrs. Bell, the Inventress of the Ladies’ Chapeau Bras, removed to No. 26, Charlotte-street, Bedford-square.

I'm not convinced. How about you?  It is certainly good to know that Mrs Bell has moved. I wouldn't want our heroines showing up at the wrong location.

Until next time